Using digipots with line level signals

Home Forums Products NS1nanosynth Using digipots with line level signals

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Davide Mancini 1 year, 5 months ago.

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  • #1433

    espenrei
    Participant

    Hi!

    I read in the manuals that you should never feed the NS1 with signals other than in the range of 0-5 volts. But is it safe to use the digipots for line level audio signals, so you can use them as a sort of a VCA or automated volume control for other instruments?

    Espen

    #1434

    werle.kyle
    Participant

    The two ends of the digipots aren’t hardwired to grounds so it could work just like any potentiometer I think? Mixing before the amp on board might be weird, though. I don’t think the mix points would cut off the negative portion of the signal. I’m not sure about the circuit, but you could put a resistor before your signal mixes.

    You could also put your signals at a middle voltage reference point with a breadboard, a quad op-amp and a few resistors. The amp removes the DC offset.

    What is line level? +-1 or 2 volts?

    #1435

    espenrei
    Participant

    Yes exactly, I thought that if they work as any potentiometer it should work. Actually I wasn’t thinking of mixing the signals back into the synth, but perhaps control on/off or volume of an external source with the ribbon or a button, through the Arduino. I’m not sure about the exact level.

    If I mix it into the synth I guess I should shift the level as you say. How would you do it with an op-amp, is there an example somewhere?

    I found this Arduino project that seems to do this wth just some resistors and some capacitors, but I haven’t tried it myself. But I guess it should be the same for the Nanosynth, perhaps?
    http://interface.khm.de/index.php/lab/interfaces-advanced/arduino-realtime-audio-processing/

    #1444

    Davide Mancini
    Keymaster

    Hi there!
    Digipots are, unfortunately, bound to the power supply of the IC, in this case 5V. You can, with a small polarizing network (a voltage divider) and a capacitor before it (coming from the signal) put the signal at half this voltage and then attenuate it…

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